At least three dead on the coast of Mexico

Flooded road in San Blas, Nayarit state

At least three people died after a powerful hurricane caused heavy rains, flash floods and landslides in western Mexico.

Roslyn, a Category 3 hurricane, landed on the Mexican Pacific coast with maximum winds of 195 km / h (120 mph).

The hurricane has since been downgraded to a tropical cyclone, but the risk of flooding remains.

Images of its aftermath showed flooded streets and overturned vehicles, as well as damaged houses.

An elderly man died when a beam from a roof fell on him and two women were killed by the collapse of buildings.

The most affected area was Tecuala, in the state of Nayarit. Further south along the coast in Sayulita, people were photographed wading and clearing mud from the area’s roads.

Map

Map

Flash floods and power outages also hit the city of Puerto Vallarta, in the neighboring state of Jalisco, but only minor damage was caused, according to the state governor.

Truck overturned in Tecuala, Nayarit state

Truck overturned in Tecuala, Nayarit state

People clearing mud from the streets in Sayulita, Nayarit state

People clearing mud from the streets in Sayulita, Nayarit state

Flooded streets in Puerto Vallarta, Jallisco state

Flooded streets in Puerto Vallarta, Jallisco state

Enrique Alfaro Ramírez said people who had been evacuated from the area started returning to their homes. Flights were resumed too, he said.

He added, however, that the beaches will remain closed for the time being.

Before the hurricane landed on Sunday, more than a dozen municipalities in Nayarit and Jalisco set up emergency shelters for those who had been evacuated.

In May, 11 people were killed after Hurricane Agatha hit the southwestern state of Oaxaca.

Scientists from the US Meteorological Service have predicted a very active hurricane season for this year with an above-average number of named storms, hurricanes and major hurricanes.

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